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Common ducted electrolysis

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Common ducted water electrolysis involves the the production of hydrogen and oxygen gases that are not separated from one another via independent ducting. Common ducting inherently allows for product gases to mix. The mixing of product hydrogen and oxygen gases, produced in a common ducted electrolyzer, produces a gas that is typically referred to as Rhodes Gas. William Rhodes patented the first common ducted electrolyzer in 1966. Soon after a subsequent researcher named Yull Brown became involved with similar technology. An offshoot was born that not only commonly ducted product hydrogen and oxygen, but pressurized the mixture. This pressurized version of Rhodes Gas soon became known as Brown's Gas.

Common ducted electrolysis should be especially distinguished from inependently ducted electrolysis; by separately ducting product hydrogen and oxygen gases, separation is possible. Note that separation of product hydrogen and oxygen gases is not possible in a common ducted electrolyzer. An independently ducted electrolyzer is typically used to produce pure quantities of hydrogen, or oxyhydrogen.

See also Edit

Patents Edit

The Rhodes Common Ducted Electrolyzer Patent. The patent was filed with the USPTO and was issued in 1966.

The Brown Common Ducted Electrolyzer Patent. The patent was filed with the USPTO and was issued in 1977.

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